1. Klint Finley

    Wired published Alan Moore’s contribution to Occupy Comics, an essay of the history of comics as subversion:

    In the derivation of the word cartoon itself we see the art-form’s insurrectionary origins: during the tumults and upheavals of a volatile seventeenth century Italy, it became both expedient and popular to scrawl satirical depictions of political opponents on the sides of cardboard packages, otherwise known as cartons. Soon, these drawings were referred to by the same name as the boxes upon which they’d been emblazoned. As a method of communicating revolutionary ideas in a few crude lampooning strokes, often to an intended audience whose reading skills were limited, the power and effectiveness of the new medium was made immediately apparent.

    This may also be the starting point for the receding but still-current attitude that comics and cartoons are best regarded as a province of the lower-class illiterate. However, following the realisation of the form’s immense political utility, it’s only with increasing difficulty that we can find a political event of any scale that has not been commemorated (and, often, most memorably commemorated) by the means of a cartoon.

    The eighteenth century, with its more readily available print media, saw the promotion of the scathing cartoon image from its lowly cardboard-box beginnings to the cheap pulp paper mass-production of the broadsheets and the illustrated chapbooks. Consequently this same period would witness the emergence of the form’s first masters, artists who could see the thrilling possibilities in this unruly and untamed new mode of cultural expression. We can see this evidenced in James Gilray’s often-scatological and lacerating barbed caricatures of the dementia-prone King George the Fourth, in William Hogarth’s stark depictions of society’s deprived and shameful lower reaches and even in the sublime illuminated texts of William Blake, in which the visionary’s radical opinions… He’d stood with the firebrands of the Gordon Riots, in a red cap denoting solidarity with the French revolutionaries across the channel, watching Newgate Prison burn…were of necessity concealed beneath a cryptic code of fierce spiritual essences; invented demi-gods with grandiose and punning names that can be viewed as having much in common with the later output of the superhero industry’s presiding genius, the genuinely great Jack Kirby.

    Full Story: Wired: Alan Moore’s Essay for the Activist Occupy Comics Anthology

  2. Danny Chaoflux on the similarities between The Invisibles by Grant Morrison and the Cartoon Network show Codename: Kids Next Door.

    1: The leader, bald, wears shades, really into spy stuff.

    2: Inventor/Shaman, always cracks jokes, “the weird one”, overweight [ie: Future Fanny].

    3: Shes nuts.

    4: Street thug with thick accent and hoodie.

    5: Cool headed, laid back tomboy, specialty is stealth and investigation.

    Theme : Worldwide loose knit cells operate in secret to protect and encourage freedom from tyranny.

    The Antagonists : ‘The Old Gods’ and their lesser manifestations.

    This has been brought up a number of places on the internet, but I wanted to shop an image to go along with it paired with a breakdown.

    Sure you could say its a blatant rip off, but I think its more interesting to think of it as a starter set of key memes.

    Stop Making Sense: Invisible Babies = Codename: Kids Next Door

    Official Codename: Kids Next Door website.

Technoccult

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